Bauhaus design armchair F51
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Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
Bauhaus design armchair
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Characteristics

Style
Bauhaus design
Seat material
fabric, leather
Frame material
oak, walnut, ash
Options
cushion
Color
gray, brown, white, black, red, customizable color
Designer
by Walter Gropius
Base type
cantilever
Base material
wooden base
Armrest
with armrests
Frame finish
lacquered
Motif
plain
Seat width

70 cm (28 in)

Total height

70 cm (28 in)

Total width

70 cm (28 in)

Total depth

70 cm (28 in)

Seat height

42 cm (17 in)

Description

We are in the arcanum of modernism. The F51 (1920) is not just any armchair, it is the iconic armchair for the director’s room in the Weimar Bauhaus. Walter Gropius had already injected his modernist dynamic into the building and created a small holistic work of art, encompassing interiors and furniture, tapestry and ceiling lamp. Nothing is randomly chosen and everything is connected. If you study the isometric layout of the director’s room you can see the furniture as part of a three-dimensional coordinate system. All major designers, including Mart Stam, have walked through this central room of the Bauhaus in Weimar. Consciously or unconsciously, they were already influenced by the overarching ideas of the F51 armchair. Its protruding armrests can be seen as a precursor of Mart Stam’s chairs without back legs and anticipate Marcel Breuer’s stool on runners (1925). “The first cantilever chair concept is from Walter Gropius, the first cantilever armrest architecture from El Lissitzky,” says Tecta’s Axel Bruchhäuser. Walter Gropius’ own thoughts: The goal of modern architecture is “to defy gravity and overcome the earth’s inertia in impression and appearance.” This later became the intellectual root of the cantilever principle and the creed of the collection in Tecta’s Cantilever Chair Museum in Lauenförde. Despite its cubic form, the chair has an almost human appearance with its heavy but floating upholstery and simple frame. With the F51 Gropius has made a piece of space around us tangible and given it a geometric shape. It seems as if the architect had intermeshed two C-shaped elements in such a way that they continue to convey suspense.
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